Saturday, December 21, 2013

A Holiday Gift of Poetry

Here is a gift of poetry as a small thank you to my readers. Wishing you all a happy holiday season. Don't forget to read more poetry; it illuminates our lives.

Toward a Winter Solstice
by Timothy Steele (published on the web site poets.org)

Although the roof is just a story high,
It dizzies me a little to look down.
I lariat-twirl the cord of Christmas lights
And cast it to the weeping birch’s crown;
A dowel into which I’ve screwed a hook
Enables me to reach, lift, drape, and twine
The cord among the boughs so that the bulbs
Will accent the tree’s elegant design.

Friends, passing home from work or shopping, pause
And call up commendations or critiques.
I make adjustments. Though a potpourri
Of Muslims, Christians, Buddhists, Jews, and Sikhs,
We all are conscious of the time of year;
We all enjoy its colorful displays
And keep some festival that mitigates
The dwindling warmth and compass of the days.

Some say that L.A. doesn’t suit the Yule,
But UPS vans now like magi make
Their present-laden rounds, while fallen leaves
Are gaily resurrected in their wake;                                            
The desert lifts a full moon from the east
And issues a dry Santa Ana breeze,
And valets at chic restaurants will soon
Be tending flocks of cars and SUVs.

And as the neighborhoods sink into dusk
The fan palms scattered all across town stand
More calmly prominent, and this place seems
A vast oasis in the Holy Land.
This house might be a caravansary,
The tree a kind of cordial fountainhead
Of welcome, looped and decked with necklaces
And centuries of green, yellow, blue, and red.

Some wonder if the star of Bethlehem
Occurred when Jupiter and Saturn crossed;
It’s comforting to look up from this roof
And feel that, while all changes, nothing’s lost,
To recollect that in antiquity
The winter solstice fell in Capricorn
And that, in the Orion Nebula,
From swirling gas, new stars are being born.


Messiah (Christmas Portions)

   A little heat caught
in gleaming rags,
in shrouds of veil,
   torn and sun-shot swaddlings:

   over the Methodist roof,
two clouds propose a Zion
of their own, blazing
   (colors of tarnish on copper)

   against the steely close
of a coastal afternoon, December,
while under the steeple
   the Choral Society

   prepares to perform
Messiah,pouring, in their best
blacks and whites, onto the raked stage.
   Not steep, really,

   but from here,
the first pew, they're a looming
cloudbank of familiar angels:
   that neighbor who

   fights operatically
with her girlfriend, for one,
and the friendly bearded clerk
   from the post office

   --tenor trapped
in the body of a baritone? Altos
from the A&P, soprano
   from the T-shirt shop:

   today they're all poise,
costume and purpose
conveying the right note
   of distance and formality.

   Silence in the hall,
anticipatory, as if we're all
about to open a gift we're not sure
   we'll like;

   how could they
compete with sunset's burnished
oratorio? Thoughts which vanish,
   when the violins begin.

   Who'd have thought
they'd be so good? Every valley,
proclaims the solo tenor,
   (a sleek blonde

   I've seen somewhere before
-- the liquor store?) shall be exalted,
and in his handsome mouth the word
   is lifted and opened

   into more syllables
than we could count, central ah
dilated in a baroque melisma,
   liquefied; the pour

   of voice seems
to makethe unplaned landscape
the text predicts the Lord
   will heighten and tame.

   This music
demonstrates what it claims:
glory shall be revealed. If art's
   acceptable evidence,

   mustn't what lies
behind the world be at least
as beautiful as the human voice?
   The tenors lack confidence,

   and the soloists,
half of them anyway, don't
have the strength to found
   the mighty kingdoms

   these passages propose
-- but the chorus, all together,
equals my burning clouds,
   and seems itself to burn,

   commingled powers
deeded to a larger, centering claim.
These aren't anyone we know;
   choiring dissolves

   familiarity in an up-
pouring rush which will not
rest, will not, for a moment,
   be still.

   Aren't we enlarged
by the scale of what we're able
to desire? Everything,
   the choir insists,

   might flame;
inside these wrappings
burns another, brighter life,
   quickened, now,

   by song: hear how
it cascades, in overlapping,
lapidary waves of praise? Still time.
   Still time to change.


And finally, here is one for all the school children and anyone who has taught them. Not exactly a holiday poem, but fit for the season. This is from my book of children's poetry, There's a Giant in My Classroom and Other Poems from Around School.

First Flakes
by Russ Walsh


Teacher’s saying something,
What it is I wouldn't know,
‘Cause I just looked out the window
And saw some flakes of snow.

I turn to Tommy Mason
And I tap him on the knee.
“It’s snowing out,” I whisper,
And he looks outside to see.

Tommy tells Cassandra;
Cassie fills in Jill and Jim.
Jim calls to Bobby Wallace;
Jill points to Paul and Tim.

Paul informs Matt Miller,
And Matt reports to Jane.
Tim says he is worried
That the snow will turn to rain.

Matt clues in his table,
And Jane breaks the news to Lynn.
Lynn pokes the ribs of Horace,
Who wakes up with a grin.

Ann asks, “How much will we get?”
Mike says, “I hope a lot!”
May cries, “Twenty inches
Is the most we ever got!”

Now everyone is talking
As we gaze upon the snow.
So why the teacher yelled at me,
I really wouldn’t know.